Getting things done

Posted: March 2, 2015 in self
Tags: , , ,
  1. The Art of Getting things done
    1. A New Practice for a New reality
    2. Getting control of your life : The five stages of mastering work flow
    3. Getting projects creatively under way: The five phases of Project Planning
  2. Practicing Stress free productivity
    1. Getting Started :Setting up the time, space and tools
    2. Collection : Coralling your stuff
    3. Processing : Getting “In” to Empty
    4. Organizing : Setting up the right bucket
    5. Reviewing : Keeping your System functional
    6. Doing : making the best action choices
    7. Getting projects under control.
  3. The power of key principles
    1. The power of the collection habit
    2. The power of next action decision
    3. The power of outcome focussing
    4. Conclusion
Two objectives
  1. Capturing all things,
  2. Disciplining yourself :- “To get the input , to let the output”
  1. The power in a karate punch comes from speed , not muscle.
  2. Controlling the open loops in there lives.
  3. Anything that does not belong where it is, the way it is, is an “open loop” pulling on your attention.
Managing commitments well requires the implementation of some basic activities and behaviors:-
• First of all, if it’s on your mind, your mind isn’t clear. Anything you consider unfinished in any way must be captured in a trusted system outside your mind, or what I call a collection bucket, that you know you’ll come back to regularly and sort through.
• Second, you must clarify exactly what your commitment is and decide what you have to do, if anything, to make progress toward fulfilling it.
• Third, once you’ve decided on all the actions you need to take, you must keep reminders of them organized in a system you review regularly.
 “In knowledge work . . . the task is not given; it has to be determined. ‘What are the expected results from this work?’ is . . . the key question in making knowledge workers productive.” And it is a question that demands risky decisions. There is usually no right answer; there are choices instead. And results have to be clearly specified, if productivity is to be achieved.”
 Outcome thinking is one of the most effective means available for making wishes reality.
 
Most often, the reason something is “on your mind” is that you want it to be different than it currently is, and yet:
• you haven’t clarified exactly what the intended outcome is;
• you haven’t decided what the very next physical action step is; and/or
• you haven’t put reminders of the outcome and the action required in a system you trust.
 
 
 
Here’s how I define “stuff”: anything you have allowed into your psychological or physical world that doesn’t belong where it is, but for which you haven’t yet determined the desired outcome and the next action step.
Instead, the key to managing all of your “stuff” is managing your actions.
not ::— managing time, managing information, or managing priorities
it might amaze you to discover how many next actions for how many projects and commitments remain undetermined by most people. It’s extremely difficult to manage actions you haven’t identified or decided on. Most people have dozens of things that they need to do to make progress on many fronts, but they don’t yet know what they are. And the common complaint that “I don’t have time to ” (fill in the blank) is understandable because many projects seem overwhelming—and are overwhelming because you can’t do a project at all! You can only do an action related to it. Many actions require only a minute or two, in the appropriate context, to move a project forward
There is no reason ever to have the same thought twice, unless you like having that thought.
 
 

The knowledge that we consider knowledge proves itself in action. What we now mean by knowledge is information in action, information focused on results.

“It seems that there’s a part of our psyche that doesn’t know the difference between an agreement about cleaning the garage and an agreement about buying a company”
“The value of goals is not in the future they describe, but the change in perception of reality they foster.”
“Use your mind to think about things, rather than think of them. You want to be adding value as you think about projects and people, not simply reminding yourself they exist.”
“The great secret about goals and visions is not the future they describe but the change in the present they engender.”
“You don’t actually do a project; you can only do action steps related to it. When enough of the right action steps have been taken, some situation will have been created that matches your initial picture of the outcome closely enough that you can call it “done.”
“Your mind is for having ideas, not holding them.”
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